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Civic Recycling & The Canadian Electricity Association Vision 2050: Modernization & Innovation

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The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) acknowledges that Canada is now at a crossroads in the future of the country’s utilities. According to the 2015 report “Electric Utility Innovation: Toward Vision 2050,” an enormous portion of the country’s infrastructure is nearing the end of its lifespan. As such it will require investments that could top $350 billion over the next decades to adequately maintain coverage and keep up with demand. At the same time, current practices and electrical generation methods may not be the best for the electrical needs of the future. That means continued innovation is necessary to provide electricity responsibly and in an environmentally friendly way.

Civic Recycling is dedicated to the aims of Vision 2050 so Canadians continue to have access to a well-maintained electrical grid.

Civic Recycling is dedicated to Vision 2050 so Canadians continue to have access to a well-maintained electrical grid. We provide the compliant products consumers need, help eliminate risk through circuit breaker testing and empower responsible disposal practices through our fluorescent bulb recycling program.

As the government works to provide oversight and electrical upgrades are performed to infrastructure throughout the country, we’re ready to partner with residential and business customers throughout Calgary & the greater Alberta region to enable your own responsible updates at reasonable prices. We work with contractors performing residential and corporate upgrades and individual customers updating items on their own properties.

What Are The Five Pillars CEA Has Adopted For Enhancing Our Electrical Grid?

At Civic Recycling, we’re proud to share how pleased we are with what Canada has already accomplished during its bid to embrace modernization and innovation for our country’s own infrastructure. According to the 2017 Sustainable Electricity Annual Report, the CEA has adopted five very important pillars to support updating and enhancing our electrical grid. Those pillars include a low-carbon future, improved infrastructure, building relationships with communities and customers, risk-management systems and business excellence.

We especially like the good stewardship and responsibility shown by the commitment within the pillars to integrate renewable energy better, mitigate the impact of climate change, increase support to low-income families and hire the best possible employees to conduct business.

The 2017 Sustainable Electricity Annual Report also shows a decreased reliance on coal and oil sources between 2015 and 2016. During the same time frame, diesel and hydroelectric usage trended slightly higher. The real winners with enormous increases included natural gas, nuclear and renewables as energy sources.

Each of those trends shows the commitment Canada has made to Vision 2050. Unfortunately, Canada’s carbon emissions did increase slightly between 2015 and 2016, but the CEA continues to work to reverse that advance.

Addressing the other pillars through progress, the Annual Report contains positive trends for infrastructure investment, lower mercury emissions, and fewer toxic spills. It shows that fewer energy corporations supported low-income customers through special programs in 2016 versus 2015 which, like carbon footprint reduction, will need continued hard work in the future to bring into line with modern times.

How does Will Civic Recycling continue To Support Vision 2050?

We stand in support of the hard work being performed throughout the provinces and territories of Canada, and especially here in Alberta, toward Vision 2050. Along the way, we look forward to continuing to assist our customers in Calgary, the surrounding area and across Canada. Whether we can help you recycle fluorescent bulbs or ballasts, test your breakers or supply all the products you need for any size electrical project, we are ready to serve.

Contact us if you have any further questions and we would be happy to answer them.

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Circuit Breaker History from Civic Recycling: Part 1 (of 3)

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Civic Recycling is a business based around products, delving into the history of circuit breakers is not something we do very often. But we thought it would be fun and informative to take a look at the history of circuit breakers, where they came from, who invented them, and where they’re going.

Parts of the story are incredibly interesting and there are some names that everyone will recognize from history who had a part in the creation of the modern circuit breaker.

History of Circuit Breakers

Being merely the introduction, today we’ll touch on a few of the notes that predated the modern circuit breaker and leave off with where things were headed at the onset of the 20th century. With that said, let’s jump into the earliest incarnations of the circuit breaker and why its invention was necessitated.

According to the book Edison’s Electric Light: Biography of an Invention, Thomas Edison, the vaunted inventor of the late 19th and early 20th century, had developed an early form of the circuit breaker according to a patent application from 1879. The purpose of his invention at the time was to protect lighting circuit wiring from accidental short circuits and overloads. Now, Edison’s version never quite took off to the extent he had hoped, as his invention was largely in sketches and the idea patented, without a true working product ever coming to fruition. But with these ideas out there, someone eventually picked up on the circuit breaker and brought it into a more commercial light.

Continue reading…

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Electrical Infrastructure in Canada: What’s Up Next?

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New Blog Post: What’s Next for Electrical Infrastructure in Canada?

As the world changes, Canada changes with it. The slow move away from fossil fuels is in progress, and this provides us the opportunity to take a look at where Canada is moving as well. As the economy works around energy generation it’s important to have a firm grasp on where things are going and also where they are coming from.

We thought it would be an enlightening topic of discussion to take a look our own electrical infrastructure and see where things are headed.


Electrical Energy Generation in Canada

Canada is quite diverse in its energy generation, being the second largest producer of hydroelectricity in the world. With the demand for electricity, especially in the industrial sector, only expected to grow, Canada has some interesting ways with how it’s going to keep up with demand. Change in electrical infrastructure, generation and production are always subject to government changes, and what parts of the country are most and least in demand.

In terms of generation, according to the government of Canada, the country is expected to continue producing hydroelectricity at high levels but will see its share decrease from 55% to 51% of total production by the year 2040. Where the slack will be picked up is in wind generation, which is expected to rise from 7% of total electricity produced to 11% by 2040. We will also see a rise in production from biomass, solar, and geothermal, which will account for about 5% also by 2040. We will also see natural gas rise from 15% to 22% over that same time span. In terms of decreasing production, nuclear energy is expected to shrink down to about 6% from 10% by 2040.

On top of that, the country is linked to a number of exciting projects moving forward, including smart grids, small-scale renewable and clean energy products, and ecoEnergy. Diversification and a smaller reliance, if ever so slightly, on the types of energy Canada has always produced seem to be what’s going to be the norm in the coming decades.


Electrical Infrastructure and Civic Recycling

I guess this all begs the question of what does it all mean? Well, it’s important to know where Canada stands on energy as there are a great many jobs and investments that rely on what the future may hold. With climate change also becoming a greater concern, finding ways to combat its effects is an important discussion and process to begin. We also must ask; how does this impact us? As an electrical supplies company, we always need to know what comes next, whether that means changes in commercial or personal sales. The rules of the game are always changing and if you can’t keep up then you’ll get left behind.

At Civic Recycling we strive to be a part of Canada’s future energy goals while maintaining the things we do that we feel make us great. The world’s, and Canada’s, consumption of electricity and electrical infrastructure will change over the coming years and we plan on being right there with it.


 

Thanks for reading and we hope to chat with you soon.

Contact us here or learn more about how we test our electrical products, safety is our top priority. Civic Recycling is committed to delivering fantastics products to our customers across Canada.

Think of us for Electrical Equipment and breakers including:

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Jobs in the Electrical Industry: What’s Available?

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Electrical Industry in Alberta

Canada is currently facing a shortage of workers in certain skilled trades, including jobs in the electrical industry, as many of the individuals now working as skilled electricians are facing retirement. According to one study, the average age for Canada’s skilled electricians is close to 50 years and, as greater numbers of workers leave the trade this will increase demand for new, trained individuals to fill that void. This will be especially true in areas that are experiencing high rates of new construction, such as Alberta.

At the top of the list in 2014’s Canada’s Best Jobs, a job as a licensed, certified electrical contractor can be extremely beneficial. Typical salaries have shown double-digit increases in the last few years, with average journeyman wages now hovering near the $35/per hour mark. After completing a 4-year apprentice program that’s a mixture of classroom and on-the-job (OJT) training, a certified electrician can find work with any number of construction, manufacturing or service companies and make a good living.

If you possess entrepreneurial desires, starting your own one- or two-person electrical company can prove even more profitable, although, as a business owner, take-home salaries will vary. For those wanting to get employment as a certified electrician with an established firm, there are positions available across the country, many of which offer great benefits such as retirement, medical/dental, vision, online education/development reimbursement, employee discounts and more.


 

Canada’s Aging Electric Infrastructure Spells Opportunity

The occupation of an industrial electrician is one of the listings on the POL, or Canadian Priority Occupation List, which details occupations currently deemed in high demand by the Canadian government due to a national shortage of skilled workers now available. By all accounts, those possessing the necessary qualifications should continue to be in demand as The Canadian Electricity Association’s Vision 2050 brings to light the need for sweeping upgrades in the nation’s aging electric system.

These ongoing upgrades, which it’s now apparent are vitally important if the electric producers/distributors are going to be able to keep up with ever-increasing user demand, requires the skills of trained electric workers.

Industrial Electrician Specialization Options

Those opting for a career in the electric industry have lots of choices, however, with an industrial electrician on the government’s Priority Occupations List, this has become a popular option. With a median income of more than $66,000 and, according to Canadian Business Magazine, a wage and employment growth in the next five years estimated at 14% and 22% respectively, industrial electricians are needed and paid well for their contribution to the skilled workforce.


 

Jobs in the Electrical Industry by Position

Some of the many positions held by industrial electricians include work in:

  • Shipyards or other marine environments
  • Aviation
  • Electric power production and delivery
  • Mills
  • Manufacturing plants
  • Mines
  • Oil and gas exploration and recovery, and more

As a trained electrician, you should possess the ability to install, maintain, repair and test all types of electric systems, including electronic control units, transformers, generators, regulators, switchgear, etc. You should also be capable of reading and interpreting blueprints, drawings, schematics and specifications set out by the code. This is just a small part of what may be required of an industrial engineer. Someone in this position may also be required to institute a comprehensive preventative maintenance program and to maintain accurate records reflecting all maintenance work done.

With so many additional facets making up today’s national electric system, including renewable resource development and new requirements for efficiency and sustainability, employment within the industry seems a sure bet. Here at Civic Recycling we employ certified electricians for our own testing and production requirements. The need for this type of skilled worker shouldn’t go away.

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